Bobo vs. Breton

Contributed by Sarah Schneider

The Tig Archives June 04, 2014

This “bohemian bourgeois” style, by way of the Marais, is right up my alley.

Bohemian Bourgeois, aptly nicknamed “bobo” by les Parisiennes, refers to a fusion of social classes, much like “Champagne socialists” in the UK, or “limousine liberals” in the states. And as loaded as all of that may be, let’s just for a moment, put the political suggestion to the side and simply talk about what it means to be “bobo chic.” I happen to love all things chic, and I certainly have a propensity for embracing all things Francophile, so this burgeoning “bohemian bourgeois” style, by way of the streets of the Marais, is right up my alley.

You know girls like this — who craft looks similar to the Olsen twins – equal parts designer, bespoke & pricey but with an air of having just rolled out of bed, or dragged through a very fashionable (albeit disheveled) tornado.

To be honest, I always lean towards a more classic Parisian style (think quintessential Breton striped shirt, which, *fun fact*, originated in 1858 and featured 21 stripes – one for each of Napoleon’s victories). I can generally be found in the aforementioned tee with some skinny black pants, or jean cut offs and some simple red boating shoes or black flats for the summer. Throw on a hat, and I am done.

This aesthetic is much more preppy chic (think Audrey Hepburn in “Funny Face”) – a stark contrast to that drapey, slouchy, relaxed bobo look. Frankly, I think most of us find ourselves in a crossroads of relatively put together + a polished throwback on any given day. The classic Breton shirt has that Cape Cod nod, Jackie O approved, but with distressed jeans. But that is life. It can’t always be perfect (something the Bobos seem to embrace) and yet it can feel remotely pulled together – à la Breton. Here are some pieces that speak to both the “Bobo” and the “Breton” in all of us. “Bobret” anyone?

Spread some Duchess of Sussex facts
Last Updated On January 21, 2019